The Odyssey: Stormcoming

 

review by reese gorman

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Tulsa-based blues and alternative rock band The Odyssey released their first EP Feb. 8. Comprised of Cobey Brown, Derek Johnson and Elijah Avery, their music is full of passion and grit. I would describe their music as if Kaleo and Young the Giant had a kid. With the voice of Sameer Gadhia and the instrumental base of Kaleo, their sound is unique and addicting.

Their new EP, titled “Stormcoming,” includes six melodic masterpieces, which tell the story of a journey.

“I’d say these songs are all a journey to gaining more confidence,” lead singer Brown said. “There are sad songs, but the point is not beating around the bush. [It’s] saying exactly what you feel and going from there.”

Picking out a definite meaning for each song is difficult, Brown said, as each song is meant to be up to interpretation.

“We tried to cover different topics with each song, different emotions,” Brown said. “Those are up to the listener to determine what each means.”

A wide array of songs is on the album. There is “Greener Pastures,” a ballad, which portrays something we can all relate to: wanting the next best thing and always seeing things as better on the other side. “Oh, he died before he realized/ Oh, that there’s no greener pasture there at all.”

Everyone is guilty of this in some form or fashion, maybe not to this extent, but we have all had experiences where we were not content with the position we were in and thought the grass was greener on the other side, only to come to find out it was just a hoax.

“Mr. Nice Guy” and “I Love You Back” are guitar-heavy rock songs, which tell a story and have strong melodies. Both these songs have a strong Kaleo feel to them. “Mr. Nice Guy” is a rock ballad with lyrics so strong you are hooked from the very beginning. “I Love You Back” is not your basic rock love song.  The lyrics address relatable problems people face when they are in love: “Well I don’t want have to bite my tongue when you’re around/ I want to tell you how I feel no matter how it sounds.” We all want to say what we mean and how we feel, but the majority of the time, we are held back by our own selves out of fear of rejection or ridicule.

One of the greatest things about this band is their ability to tell a story and evoke a feeling in you without sacrificing their sound. Their rock feel and guitar-heavy sound is never compromised for lyrics; in fact, they complement each other. “Forgotten Souls” and “75 to Ramona” both tell stories of love. As long as the two lovers are together, they don’t care what happens. They just want to be with the person they love, regardless of circumstance.

The last song on the EP, “You Were Gone,” is a sadistic breakup song with heavy lyrics and a dark piano base. “Your arms were home and it’s not something I can fix/ but now I’m homesick.” These words are strong and powerful. We tend to find comfort and make ourselves a figurative home within the ones we love. We place our identity in them and who we are based on their love for us to the point where if they leave and we separate, it leaves us feeling empty and missing them. Much like leaving home for the first time, you tend to miss that comfort and sense of security home provides you with, completing the analogy of losing a relationship to the feeling of homesickness.

The Odyssey is a band you have to keep an eye out for. With one headline show under their belt and many more to come, the sky is the limit for this young group of guys. I have never seen so many people sing and mosh to a local band’s song than I did this past Saturday at their show. The fans were loving every minute of the show, and it all started with the love and passion the band brings on stage. There are big things to come for The Odyssey, mark my words.